Classical Osteopathy Bookshop Blog

The Life and Times of John Martin Littlejohn

The Life and Times of John Martin Littlejohn

The Life and Times of John Martin Littlejohn

In his biography The Life and Times of John Martin Littlejohn, published in 1999, John Wernham begins his introduction  “Any attempt to analyse the character of John Martin Littlejohn is confronted with a complex that has no entry and no completion.  He was and remains an enigma.”

This book is a true account by the one man who knew him, lived next door to him, travelled with him, studied under him and spent his lifetime practising, teaching and publishing what Littlejohn taught him — John Wernham.

In The Life and Times of John Martin Littlejohn, John Wernham writes that Littlejohn was “a warm parent and a tough disciplinarian; he was a quiet man, soft-spoken and with a manner that was diffident and sometimes withdrawn to the point of indifference.  Wryly, perhaps, it was often noted that his farewell was a shade more cordial than his greeting and there can be no doubt at all that he was a man who preferred to be left alone.

My first encounter with John Martin was on the cricket field, a family field it must be said and I, being something of a fast bowler at the age of eight years, had reached sufficient renown to show the head of the house something of my true metal.  With all this very much in my mind, I put on every ounce of speed of which my puny arm was capable in the determination to topple the great man’s stumps.  But the batsman retired without losing his wicket and the bowler never completed the over and has never quite made it ever since”.

In The Life and Times of John Martin Littlejohn, John Wernham also wrote “He was orientated to his beloved osteopathy to such an extent that domestic affairs sometimes took second place.  Not that the family lacked the basic necessities of life.  One friend of the family once remarked, ‘If you are feeling down, pay a call on the Littlejohns and you will feel the better for it.’  There were many such friends who took advantage of this American style in hospitality and the house was often bulging with all kinds and types of guests.”

To read more of “The Life and Times of John Martin Littlejohn” you can purchase a copy from the JWCCO Bookshop for £25 here: http://www.johnwernhamclassicalosteopathy.com/product/the-life-and-times-of-john-martin-littlejohn/

 

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